The Colony Theatre Company Website InfoSearchContactsLinkstShoppingDirectionsVolunteerJoin the TroupeAccoladesSubscribeActors and StaffHistoryTicketsThe TheatreNewsPast SeasonsCurrent SeasonHomeClickable Image
Season Info

The Recantation of Galileo Galilei
(scenes from history, perhaps)
By Eric Bentley
 


Robert Ackerman, Andrew Marzec, Albert Lord, and Kevin Miyasato


Director
Set
Lighting
Costumes

Terrence Shank
Gene Mazzanti
Terrence Shank
Don Woodruff
Maggie Bodek

CAST and SCENES

Act I

Scene 1: On Revolutions


Virginia
Benedetto
Father Sarpi
Signor Sagredo
Galileo Galilei

Theresa Bailey
Castelli Paul Haber
Stuart Lancaster
Garth Pillsbury
Robert Ackerman
Scene 2: The Telescope

Professor Rizzi
Professor Guarini
Professor Lorini
Professor Seggizi
Christopher Scheiner

John Clark
Don Woodruff
Michael Wadler
Larry G. Cloud
Alex Zonn
Scene 3: A Villa in Florence

Scene 4: A Watchdog of the Lord


Caccini

Tobias Anderson
Scene 5: The Investigation

Inquisitor

Gregory Post
Scene 6: A Philanthropist

Niccolini
Cosimo de Medici

Larry G. Cloud
Arnie Shamblin
Scene 7: The Master of Controversial Questions

Secretary 
Cardinal Bellarmine

John Clark
Rue Knapp
 

Scene 8: The Manuscript

Act II

The Inquisition

 

Secretary
Firenzuola
Cardinal Lucignano
Cardinal Sordi
Cardinal Gorazio
Cardinal Bandolfi
Cardinal Silotti
Guard

Todd Nielsen
Tom Van Buren
Mark Fletcher
Gregory Post
Don Woodruff
Jeffrey Markle
Robert Budaska
Trevor Banyard
Scene 2: The Commissar General

Scene 3: A Sincere Statesman

 

Pope Urban VIII
Page

Albert Lord
Kevin Miyasato
Scene 4: The Recantation

Synopsis

Place: Various cities in Italy
Time: The 17th Century


"It is easy to be a martyr. It is much more difficult to appear in a shady light for the sake of the idea."
Rabbi Eybeschutz in Feuchtwanger’s Jud Suss
"Today the hero is ideally the man who resists without being killed. Cunning, as the mental faculty which is the equivalent of endurance, has become, not the better part of valor, but certainly the essential part."

John Berger
"It is considered that Oppenheimer is deeply concerned with gaining a worldwide reputation as a scientist and a place in history as a result of the [Manhattan Project]. It is also believed that the Army is in the position of being able to allow him to do so or to destroy his name, reputation, and career, if it should choose to do so. Such a possibility, if strongly presented to him, would possibly give him a different view of his position with respect to the Army . . . "

Memorandum of a United States security agent in the dossier of J. Robert Oppenheimer, 1943
"If all you had to do to rid yourself of the new ideas was to stop the mouth of one person, that might be easy, but you would have to forbid all men to look at the sky lest they see how Mars and Venus are behaving. Even to build a wall around the thinkers is not always easy, for the true philosopher will not stay on the ground: he flies, like the eagle, even if, like the eagle, he must fly alone. Who can set bounds to the mind of men? . . . But I had rather all my books were burned, I had rather tear out my right eye, than lend comfort to the enemies of my church and endanger my immortal soul."

Galileo Galilei, 1613